MOLD ANALYSIS

ETL utilizes Olympus BH microscopes that are fully capable of reading any type of non-viable air, surface, bulk, and tape mold samples.

ETC Mold Analysis

non-viable airSpore / Particulate

Non-Viable air sample analysis report includes the genus level for each fungi or is grouped into appropriate spore categories. Final results per each fungi or group are reported in number of total spores, spores per cubic meter and percentage of total count. Additional info may include background debris level and additional notes. All sample sets should include a representative outdoor sample for comparison.

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ETC Mold Analysis

mold analysisSurface Tape

Surface tape analysis is reported in genus level. Samples should be taken with transparent tape (not invisible or frosted) and adhered to a slide or folded and put into a Ziploc bag. Final results are recorded in genus, with additional information including spore level, active growth, dehydrated spores, and background debris level.

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ETC Mold Analysis

mold analysis Surface Swab

Surface swab analysis is reported at the genus level. Final results are recorded in genus, with additional information including spore level, active growth, dehydrated spores, and background debris level.

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sampling techniquesBulk Sampling

1

Taking Samples

Bulk samples are taken by extracting portions of the substrate to which the fungi are attached. For instance, if the mold is growing on drywall, either the paper layer of the drywall or an entire piece of drywall is removed and sent to the laboratory for analysis.

2

Packaging Samples

Bulk material can be placed into a normal Ziploc bag. Be sure to label each bulk sample so that both you and the laboratory can easily identify it.

3

Chain of Custody

Be sure to include a chain of custody with the samples when sending them to the laboratory.

4

Sampling Tips

If using a knife or razor blade to cut the substrate, be sure to decontaminate it before any further use to prevent cross contamination of samples.

sampling techniquesTape Sampling

1

What You Need

Tape samples are taken by using transparent tape (do not use “invisible” or “satin” tape) and placing it over the surface on which the mold is growing. You will need about a two to three inch piece of tape.

2

Tape Application

With the sticky side toward the area to be sampled, press down firmly on the area. Do not press down too lightly or you may just get spores and not the spore bearing structures necessary for identification. Do not press down too hard either, you may come away with the paper or paint surface.

3

Packaging Sample

After you have taken the sample, fold the sticky side of the tape together and place it in a Ziploc bag.

4

Chain of Custody

Remember to label your bag and be sure to include a chain of custody with the samples when sending them to the laboratory.